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Connecting California's Regions to the State and Each Other
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CalRegions Email Newsletters Archive

Volume III, Issue 1 - January/February 2002

SPECIAL ISSUE: CIVIC ENTREPRENEUR SUMMIT 2002

Editor's Note: This issue focuses on the proceedings and outcomes of the 5th Annual Civic Entrepreneur Summit, held at the Claremont Resort in Berkeley on January 13th to 15th. CCRL invited teams from 21 Collaborative Regional Initiatives (CRIs) and their colleagues and allies to come together to share, learn, and mobilize around regional solutions to California's most pressing economic, social equity and environmental challenges. For additional on-line information about the Summit, including the Summit agenda, profiles of the 21 CRIs, and a list of participants, please visit: http://calregions.urbaninsight.com/pdf/SummitBook02.pdf

CONTENTS:

Preface: Overview of the Summit

  1. The Speaker's Commission on Regionalism--Presentation of the Final Report to Assembly Speaker Robert M. Hertzberg: From Study to Action!

  2. The Economy, Infrastructure and State Budget: Linking Short and Long-Term Strategies [and February 4 State Hearing announcement]

  3. Collaborative Regional Initiatives: "Coming of Age"
    A. Turning Regionalism Into A Popular Movement
    B. CRI Best Practices: the "CCRL" System and Profiles from the Summit Briefing Book
    C. Collaborative Regional Initiative Network Action Group

  4. CRI Strategic Thinking, Fundraising, Communications and Leadership Development: Strategies for Long-Term Sustainability

  5. New Ideas and Initiatives for 2002
    A. Regional Security
    B. Cycles of Civic and Social Innovation
    C. Irvine-CCRL Workforce Investment Demonstration Project
    D. California Policy Forum: Civic Engagement for Policy Action
    E. Regional Energy Authorities
    F. Community Indicators: Going to Scale

  6. The 2002 Civic Entrepreneur Awards Sponsored by the Morgan Family Foundation

Preface: Overview of the Summit

On January 13-15, 2002, the California Center for Regional Leadership (CCRL) convened the 5th Annual Civic Entrepreneur Summit for the leaders of California's twenty-one Collaborative Regional Initiatives. CRIs were represented at the Summit by volunteer and staff teams as well as leaders and experts from government, business, research institutions, community-based organizations and the media. CCRL is deeply appreciative of the counsel we received from CRI leaders and others in the extended CCRL family to plan and organize the Summit to address CRI needs and interests. As always, we are deeply grateful to The James Irvine Foundation and the Morgan Family Foundation for their continuing support of CCRL and the Civic Entrepreneur Summit. We are also grateful to the East Bay Community Foundation and the Peninsula Community Foundation for their special grant support for the Summit.

The 216 Summit participants came away motivated, challenged, and no doubt inspired by the example of this year's two recipients of the 2002 Civic Entrepreneur of the Year Awards. This year's "volunteer" Civic Entrepreneur of the Year was Dr. Manuel Pastor, Jr., Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies and Director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance and Community at the University of California Santa Cruz. The "professional" Civic Entrepreneur of the Year Award was presented to Carol Whiteside, founder and President of the Great Valley Center. On a special note, CCRL was proud to announce at the Summit that this year and in years to come, the Civic Entrepreneur Award is sponsored by the Morgan Family Foundation. As CCRL Board Chair, Sunne Wright McPeak remarked at the presentation, "this award honors the very generous support that Becky and Jim Morgan have provided to the California Center for Regional Leadership, and the great inspiration they both continue to provide to civic entrepreneurs in California and across the nation."

The following edition of CalRegions features highlights from the 2002 Summit. More detailed written information from the Summit (workshop digests, etc.) will be available by February 15 on the CalRegions website, calregions.urbaninsight.com, and will also be included in the CCRL "The State of California's Regions Report 2002" (SOCR 2002), to be released electronically and in print later this spring.

I. The Speaker's Commission on Regionalism: Presentation of the Final Report to Assembly Speaker Robert M. Hertzberg: From Study to Action!

The Summit began on Sunday afternoon with a presentation of the Final Report of the Speaker's Commission on Regionalism (SCOR): "The New California Dream-Regional Solutions for 21st Century Challenges." SCOR Chair Nick Bollman and six of the thirty-one Commissioners presented a summary of the findings and recommendations to the Speaker and the Summit participants. After 14 months of study, Commission outreach meetings in 8 regions across the state, 100 presentations, and 15 newly commissioned research papers, the Commission's Report recommends more than a hundred policy reforms across a wide variety of challenges: the economy, workforce, social equity, state-local finance reform, growth, schools, the environment, regional collaboration, state government reform, and building a new regional civic culture. The Speaker includes a four-page letter in the Report indicating those recommendations that are especially noteworthy and in his remarks at the Summit pledged to move the Report's recommendations into legislative action. He also announced that the new Assembly Speaker, Herb Wesson, has decided to continue the Commission in order to further educate and inform policymakers and the general public about regional solutions. A methodical legislative and communications strategy will unfold over the next several months.

A downloadable version of the Final Report will be available February 15th, 2002 on the Speaker's Commission for Regionalism Web site at www.regionalism.org.

II. Opening Plenary: The Economy, Infrastructure and State Budget: Linking Short and Long-Term Strategies

A recurring theme at the Summit: find ways to meet short-term challenges that continue to advance long-term strategies. The Monday opening plenary panel included Jay Harris, writer and lecturer, and former Publisher, San Jose Mercury-News; Stephen Levy, Director, Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy; Jim Ghielmetti, CEO, Signature Properties, Inc., and member, Governor's Commission on Building for the 21st Century; and the Honorable John Vasconcellos, State Senator, Chair, Senate Committee on Education, Select Committee on Economic Development, and Joint Committee on Preparing California for the 21st Century. Panelists urged the CRIs to keep their focus on long-term planning and investment, in education, infrastructure, economic growth strategies, and state-local finance; and to encourage the Governor and other state policymakers to do likewise. Senator Vasconcellos announced an important upcoming hearing on these very issues:

A Joint Hearing of the California State Senate Select Committee on Economic Development and the Assembly Committee on Jobs, Economic Development and the Economy is scheduled for Monday, February 4, 2002. "The High Road to Economic Prosperity: The Need for Long-Range Planning." Among those invited to appear: Steve Levy, Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy; Jean Ross, The California Budget Process; Nick Bollman, California Center for Regional Leadership; Elaine Howe, State Auditor; Lon Hatamiya, Secretary of Technology, Trade & Commerce; Maria Contreras-Sweet, Secretary of Business, Transportation & Housing and Chair of the Governor's Commission on Building for the 21st century; Doug Henton, Collaborative Economics; Bill Hauck, California Business Roundtable; Lee Harrington, LAEDC; Sunne Wright McPeak, Bay Area Council; Carol Whiteside, Great Valley Center; and Patrick Johnston, former California State Senator.

For more information on the California State Senate Select Committee on Economic Development, or on the Senate Joint Committee on Preparing California for the 21st Century, visit the website of State Senator John Vasconcellos.

For further information and ideas on economic recovery, see the October issues of CalRegions, "Regions: Homeland Security, Economic Recovery, and Sustainable Development," posted on the CalRegions website, calregions.urbaninsight.com/projects/enews-archive.html.

A special intensive workshop carried the general plenary discussion down to essential, specific regional and state-regional strategies for infrastructure planning and investment. It featured presentations from Bill Fulton of the California Planning & Development Report; Cathy Creswell of the State Department of Housing and Community Development; John Ferrera of the State Business Transportation and Housing Agency; Jon Clark of the Santa Barbara Economic Community Project; and Tom O'Malley of the Tri-Valley Business Council. A digest of this workshop will be posted shortly at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

III. Collaborative Regional Initiatives: "Coming of Age"

Whether inspired by the serious civic duties evoked in our post-9/11 world, or the downturn in the economy, or perhaps by the fact that CRI achievements in their communities are growing and palpable, this Summit more than ever before evidenced the growing maturity and collaborative development of the network, and the need and opportunity for enhanced collaborative action across regions and across the state. There are 21 CRIs, and they are coming of age.

A. Turning Regionalism Into A Popular Movement

The Summit luncheon presentation on Monday, entitled, "Turning Regionalism Into A Popular Movement," featured a presentation by Mark Baldassare, Senior Fellow, Survey Director, and Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Public Policy, Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC); and Dan Yankelovich, Founder and Chairman, Viewpoint Learning, Inc. Mary Walshok, San Diego Dialogue moderated the panel presentation. Mark Baldassare presented a special PPIC "Special Survey of San Diego County," which provided a baseline scan of the public policy awareness and opinions of a cross-section of San Diegans. Dan Yankelovich then described the ChoiceWork Dialogue Project, which, working with the San Diego Dialogue, took the survey's results, and through the deliberate application of new information and intense, facilitated dialogue, enabled a representative sample of San Diegans to explore what policy scenarios they would choose to meet the region's growth challenges. The project is a new paradigm for understanding public opinion. Rather than the flat, momentary and sometimes under-informed responses yielded by some public opinion measures, the combination of PPIC Survey and ChoiceWork Dialogues enables a deeper, richer understanding of public opinions and attitudes. This then can be communicated to policymakers who want to know how the public would respond to the various, sometimes risk-taking policy choices they face. With support from the Irvine Foundation, the California Policy Forum and CRIs are replicating this project in three other regions around the state, focused on state policy choices in fiscal, land use and governance reform. More information on the ChoiceWork Dialogue is posted at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

B. CRI Best Practices: the "CCRL System" and Profiles from the Summit Briefing Book

CCRL was established primarily to provide technical and program support to California's CRIs. In order to establish a proactive and customized means of support, CCRL developed the "CRI Compact Review and Learning" System. During the fall of 2001, CCRL met individually with the 21 CRIs to launch the CCRL System, and to collect pertinent information to analyze the CRI's individual and collective needs for CCRL support during 2002. The workshops organized at the Summit were based on the CCRL System analysis of CRI needs. For those interested, the workshop agenda and the analysis of CRI needs is presented in matrix form at http://calregions.urbaninsight.com/pdf/SummitBook02.pdf. The Briefing Book also presents current profiles of the 21 CRIs, and a "showcase" example of best practices for each CRI.

C. Collaborative Regional Initiative Network Action Group

An unplanned, spontaneous outcome of the Summit is creation of the CRI Network Action Group to inform and mobilize CRIs on matters requiring common action, including state policy matters. More on this new Group will be reported in future editions of CalRegions.

IV. CRI Strategic Thinking, Fundraising, Communications and Leadership Development: Strategies for Long-Term Sustainability

Summit participants acknowledged and celebrated the role that the Irvine Foundation has played in advancing the CRIs, CCRL and the CRI Network, as well as the support of many other philanthropies. But because this work of long-term civic engagement in regional problem solving doesn't appear in the giving guidelines of many foundations, the Summit explored ways to bring this movement to the attention and action of a more diverse array of funders. Other sessions focused on how to tell the CRI story to a diverse set of "audiences" and how to develop new, diverse and effective leadership.
  1. Strategic Thinking and Fund-raising. Among the workshops were two sessions central to the advancement of CRIs. In a session on Strategic Thinking, Deb Nankivell, Executive Director of the Fresno Business Council described the deliberative process by which over the past few years she and her colleagues and "champions" have come to create the new Fresno Area Collaborative Regional Initiative. In a second session, on CRI Fund-Raising, Mary Walshok, Associate Vice Chancellor, University of California, and a leader of San Diego Dialogue, described the Dialogue's sophisticated, targeted and successful fund-raising strategy. Paul Vandeventer, Executive Director, Community Partners, facilitated both sessions.

  2. The Summit also included a luncheon panel presentation on "Foundations and Regions." Presenters included Becky Morgan, President and Board Member of the Morgan Family Foundation; David Harris, Director, the South Florida Program, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Marsha Rea, Regional Civic Alliance for Ventura County and the Ventura County Community Foundation; and Michael Howe, President, East Bay Community Foundation.

  3. Communications. In a session focused on "branding the region and the CRI," Carol Whiteside, President of the Great Valley Center, discussed GVC's efforts to create a regional identity for leaders and institutions in the Central Valley, and linking the new identity to and through the work of GVC. Bob Scott, Project Director, Civic Center Group, reviewed the Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley's strategies for creating a regional identity in the San Fernando Valley, using the new regional brand, the "Valley of the Stars." Julie Meier Wright, President and CEO, San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation discussed branding and marketing the San Diego region, and conveying the new role of an EDC on growth issues, education, and other SDREDC program interests. And Luis Arteaga, Associate Director, Latino Issues Forum discussed how to reach under-represented groups through second-language presses and other techniques. In a second session, Dave Regan, Publisher, Santa Cruz Sentinel and John Schueler, Publisher, Daily News focused on techniques CRIs can use in reaching the mainstream media, for news coverage, editorial support, and institutional partnerships. They discussed the features of the working partnerships between their newspapers and the CRIs in their regions. Lisa Dobbins, Executive Director, Action Pajaro Valley presented communications strategies for reaching under-represented groups-in particular, to the majority Latino community in her region.

  4. Leadership Development. This session explored individual and institutional leadership and the difference between traditional leadership and the new leadership emerging in the form of Regional Stewardship. Regional stewardship is values-driven, cross-sectoral, practice-based leadership. Presentations from Carol Whiteside, Jim Sayer, Odin Zackman, and Chuck Supple explored the extraordinary new statewide and regional strategies for developing a new generation of leaders as regional stewards.
Notes from the these workshops and the "Regions and Foundations" remarks by Marsha Rea and David Harris will be posted shortly at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

V. New Ideas and New Initiatives for 2002

The Summit is always an opportunity to hear new ideas, deal with new realities, and develop new program models. The following is a sampling of such innovation showcased at the 2002 Summit.

A. Regional Security
Cosponsored by the Alliance for Regional Stewardship, a breakfast program addressed the opportunity and necessity for regional planning for homeland security, including preparedness and emergency response for the near term and rethinking infrastructure systems for the long term. The Alliance is working with the White House to advance the idea of regional planning, and CCRL and the CRIs will be working with the Alliance and the Governor's office to initiate efforts here in California. For further information on homeland security, please visit the Alliance website at www.regionalstewardship.org, and also the October CalRegions, "Regions: Homeland Security, Economic Recovery, and Sustainable Development," at http://calregions.urbaninsight.com/projects/enewsvIIi7.html. A digest of this meeting will be posted shortly at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

B. Cycles of Civic and Social Innovation
Doug Henton and Kim Walesh of Collaborative Economics presented a plenary session on "The Cycles of Social Innovation." Henton and Walesh discussed and compared the cycle of economic, social, and civic innovation and its implications for regional leadership. Drawing on Joseph Schumpeter's ideas about "waves of innovation" and the business cycle, they offered a new framework for thinking similarly about civic and social innovation and productivity. They held that today's civic entrepreneurs and regional leaders are at the forefront of a new movement and wave of "civic innovation," likened to California's Progressive movement at the turn of the 20th Century.

To learn more about the work of Collaborative Economics, visit www.coecon.com. Doug Henton and Kim Walesh can be contacted at the offices of Collaborative Economics, 785 Castor Street, Suite A, Mountain View, CA 94041; Phone 650-404-8120; Fax 650-623-0090; Email info@coecon.com.

C. Irvine-CCRL Workforce Investment Demonstration Project
With CRIs, state agency officials, and leading economic/workforce experts present, an intensive workshop was presented on the Irvine Foundation - CCRL "Workforce Investment Demonstration Project: Lessons Learned to Date and Assessing Future Results." This demonstration is a new paradigm, based on geographically focused career progression, and would streamline and improve the effectiveness of the state and regions' workforce training and education programs. Participants in the session included a team from The James Irvine Foundation and the CCRL project team; participating CRIs; the California Workforce Investment Board team; Employment Development Department team; the Technology Trade and Commerce Agency team; the Community Colleges EdNet and EDD/Employment Training Panel project leaders, and the California Workforce Association.

For additional information on CRIs and Workforce Investment, see the March-April 2001 edition of the CalRegions newsletter, "Workforce Development and California's Collaborative Regional Initiatives," at http://calregions.urbaninsight.com/projects/enews-vIIi2.html.

D. California Policy Forum: Civic Engagement for Policy Action
Funded by the Hewlett and Irvine Foundations, this new consortium of eight organizations is working with CRIs around the state to help inform and expand regional civic leadership on fundamental land use, governance and fiscal reform issues, particularly those at the state level. A special Summit intensive workshop focused on the CPF effort. For more information, see the November-December issue of CalRegions at calregions.urbaninsight.com/projects/enewsvIIi8.html. CPF also made a special announcement about its upcoming statewide summit:

  • Save The Date! The California Policy Forum's State Summit, "California Growth Challenges 2002: Sustaining Our Regions, Securing Our Future", will be held May 29-30 at the Sheraton Grand Sacramento Hotel. The event is sponsored by the CPF Partners: California Center for Regional Leadership, California Futures Network, The Center for Governmental Studies; Cities, Counties, and Schools Partnership; Environmental Policy Center; Latino Issues Forum; League of Women Voters of California Education Fund; and San Diego Dialogue. Please contact the California Futures Network for further information and pre-registration at: 510-238-9762 ext.146, or e-mail: angel@calfutures.org For information about other California Policy Forum activities and events, contact Sandy Grant, the CPF Network Facilitator at sgrant@calpolicyforum.net, 606 South Olive Street, Suite 2400, Los Angeles, CA 90014, phone 213-439-9640 x 29.

E. Regional Energy Authorities
Though California's immediate energy crisis has been tamed (if not yet fully funded), civic and government leaders are still concerned about the long-term energy health of the state and its regions. Senate staffer Jeff Brown discussed with CRIs ways to organize civic support to optimize regional energy self-sufficiency and sustainability. Through a system of clean local generation and co-generation, expanded use of renewable regional energy sources, and regional and community energy efficiency and conservation, California may be able to reduce its over-reliance on uncertain, unreliable, and potentially unaffordable external energy sources. CCRL and the CRIs will explore the opportunity to build a new civic education and infrastructure to achieve this end. Notes on this meeting will be available shortly at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

F. Community Indicators: Going to Scale
CCRL and cosponsor the Foundation Consortium invited CRIs and leaders from the social and health indicators movement to come together to develop new field-building strategies. Community indicators are a powerful new "tool" for assessing a community's progress, educating the public on key issues and mobilizing for action. But thus far it is a disaggregated set of excellent individual projects, and not yet a "field." Judy Chynoweth, Executive Director of the Foundation Consortium, described the prior convening efforts of CCRL and the Consortium, and the assembled group explored the possibility of working together over the coming year to: 1) coordinate and improve the quality of practice in the field; 2) encourage ease of access to state data sources, and 3) begin building toward a "bottom-up" aggregate state indicators report. Notes on this meeting will be available shortly at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

VI. The 2002 Civic Entrepreneur Awards Sponsored by the Morgan Family Foundation

As mentioned in the Preface, CCRL announced at the Summit that this year and in years to come, the Civic Entrepreneur Award is sponsored by the Morgan Family Foundation.

This year's "volunteer" Civic Entrepreneur of the Year was Dr. Manuel Pastor, Jr., Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies and Director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance and Community at the University of California Santa Cruz. Manuel's research on Latin American and U.S. urban issues has been widely published, but most Civic Entrepreneurs know him from his contribution to the regional movement through his book "Regions That Work: How Cities and Suburbs Can Grow Together," co-authored with Peter Dreier, Eugene Grigsby and Marta Lopez-Garza. Pastor served this past year as a member of the Speaker's Commission on Regionalism (SCOR). Additionally, Pastor serves on the Advisory Council of the Public Policy Institute of California and as a board member of the Silicon Valley Civic Action Network. His dedication and effectiveness as a community activist working in the poor neighborhoods of Los Angeles and elsewhere around the state is well-known and admired by Civic Entrepreneurs all over California.

The "professional" Civic Entrepreneur of the Year Award was presented to Carol Whiteside, founder and President of the Great Valley Center (GVC). Carol has almost twenty years of government experience, has been a school board member, a council member, the Mayor of Modesto, and has served as Assistant Secretary of the State Resources Agency and as Director of Intergovernmental Affairs for Governor Pete Wilson. The Great Valley Center is a private, non-profit, and non-partisan organization committed to building support for California's Great Central Valley as a distinct region and assisting in the process of planning for the 21st century. Through GVC, Carol has created an institution that has helped to transform the idea of California's Central Valley, to the "Great" Central Valley, tackling some of California's most severe economic, social and environmental challenges. GVC envisions the Central Valley as a great natural resource; as a leader in the next economy, encompassing highly productive agriculture; and as an example to all of California on how to achieve a sustainable community. To contact Carol Whiteside and learn more about the work of the Great Valley Center, visit www.greatvalley.org.

Well, that's all folks! Click here for additional information about the 2002 Summit, or write or call us at CCRL: 455 Market Street, Suite 1100, San Francisco, CA 94105…415-882-7300.