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CCRL California Center for Regional Leadership
Connecting California's Regions to the State and Each Other
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San Francisco, CA 94104
Phone (415) 445-8975
Fax (415) 445-8974

CalRegions Email Newsletters Archive

Volume II, Issue 4 - June 2001

Land Use and California's Regions

Contents

Preface

I. Land Use and California's Regional Initiatives (CRIs)

A. Bay Area Alliance for Sustainable Development (BAASD)
B. Metropolitan Forum Project (MFP)
C. Orange County Business Council (OCBC)
D. Santa Barbara Region Economic Community Project (SBRECP)
E. San Diego Dialogue (SDD)

II. New PPIC Survey on Growth
    • Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) Statewide Survey: Special Survey on Growth-May 2001, by Mark Baldassare, Senior Fellow and Survey Director
III. Regional News & Information

A. New Report
    • CCRL - State of California's Regions Report, SOCR 2001
B. New Project
    • California 2000 Project (C2K)
C. New Job Announcements
    • C2K Partners - Network Facilitator
    • CCRL - CRI Program Officer
    • CCRL - C2K Program Officer

Preface

During the next 20 years, California's population will grow by an estimated 12 million people - primarily from births, not immigration - an increase of approximately one-third over the current population of 34 million. The question for civic leaders is how can we accommodate this growth and maintain our quality of life and our economic prosperity? California's Collaborative Regional Initiatives (CRIs) emphasize the idea of sustainable communities and the inter-relationship of economic, social, and environmental issues, and apply this idea to the growth challenges in their regions. As such, CRIs around California are facing up to very important land use challenges and infrastructure deficits in housing, transportation, schools and other essential infrastructure "building blocks." Many are facilitating regional discussion and consensus processes about land use. This issue of CalRegions provides examples of what CRIs are currently doing to face the challenges of land use through "smarter" growth strategies.

I. Land Use and California's Regional Initiatives (CRIs)

A. Bay Area Alliance for Sustainable Development

The Bay Area Alliance and the five regional agencies--Association of Bay Area Governments, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Regional Water Quality Control Board, and Bay Conservation and Development Commission--have joined together to promote smart growth and sustainable development through the Smart Growth Strategy and Regional Livability Footprint Project. Beginning in September 2001 the partnership will hold two rounds of workshops in each of the nine Bay Area counties. The overall goal is to achieve support for a preferred land use pattern that will inform how the region could grow over the next 20 years, and a fiscal and regulatory incentive package to eliminate barriers to smart growth. To learn more about how to participate in this important process, visit the website at www.abag.ca.gov/planning/smartgrowth.

The Bay Area Alliance for Sustainable Development is launching the Regional Livability Footprint Project to relate to the Draft Compact for a Sustainable Bay Area. As a regional framework, the Draft Compact was developed to complement and build upon local sustainability efforts. The Bay Area Alliance is working with cities and counties, interest groups, and residents throughout the nine-county Bay Area region to highlight how this approach can provide local benefits. The Draft Compact integrates the three "Es" of sustainable development: prosperous economy, quality environment, and social equity.

For more information on the Footprint Project, or the Draft Compact for a Sustainable Bay Area, contact Andrew Michael, Vice President Sustainable Development, Bay Area Council. Phone: 415-981-6600, Email: amichael@bayareacouncil.org. For more information on the Bay Area Council visit their website at www.bayareacouncil.org.

B. Metropolitan Forum Project (MFP)

MFP is one of nine sponsors of New Schools / Better Neighborhoods (NSBN), a civic advocacy organization formed to promote a 21st Century vision for California's urban school districts: new schools should be centers of neighborhoods and likewise, neighborhoods and communities should serve as centers of learning. NSBN contends that new facilities should be small, community-centered schools which serve as anchors to neighborhoods by providing a range of services that can be accessed and utilized by all residents and community stakeholders. One of NSBN's primary goals is to reduce sprawl development and suburban migration by more efficient and imaginative use of limited urban land.

In a recently published article, NSBN Chairman, and MFP Director David Abel, outlines a call to action for the current and growing need for a comprehensive plan to expand school facilities. Too often, Abel contends, new schools are constructed on the fringe, accessible only by car trips or long rides in yellow buses--the very antithesis of smart growth principles of compact, walkable communities. A new NSBN paradigm as outlined by Abel, conceives of schools as centers of neighborhoods and communities as centers of learning. The concept calls for school districts to move away from large, isolated schools, and look to partner with neighborhoods to build smaller, more intimate campuses in close proximity to parks, libraries, and other facilities like healthcare clinics that offer joint-use possibilities. Gymnasiums and play fields could double as community parks and recreation centers; auditoriums could serve as community theaters; libraries, family health centers, and other community services could be integrated into the existing school framework and contribute to a thriving neighborhood.

NSBN holds that these concepts will help to solve the current school debacle and begin to answer how California will cope with the enormous influx of people that will live in this state by 2020. Instead of consuming tremendous quantities of land and encouraging sprawling development, community schools can help to focus growth around smart principles. They have begun to lessen dependence on cars by placing necessary facilities within communities, in turn lessening congestion, curtailing air pollution, and preserving dwindling open space.

To read more about the strategies advocated by NSNB link to the NSBN website at www.nsbn.org, and link to the NSBN new Summer 2001 Newsletter at www.nsbn.org/summer2001/leveragedstrategies.html. To learn about the Metropolitan Forum Project and their work with NSBN, visit the MFP website www.metroforum.org, or contact David Abel at Metropolitan Forum Project, 811 West Seventh Street, Suite 900, Los Angeles, California 90017, Phone: (213) 629-9019 Fax: (213) 623-9207, abl@earthlink.net.

C. Orange County Business Council (OCBC)

The Orange County Affordable Home Ownership Alliance (OCAHOA) partnering with the Orange County Business Council, Merrill Lynch, the Enterprise Foundation, the Building Industry Association, the County of Orange, Fannie Mae, Wells Fargo, the Olson Company, and GMAC explores ways to increase the availability and supply of affordable housing for working families in Orange County.

OCAHOA collaborated with Cal State Fullerton Foundation, the City of Buena Park, Orange County Flood Control District, Ambling West LLC, and HUD, in building CSUF faculty and administrators' housing on an infill site in Buena Park. According to current plans, there will eventually be 40 town homes, 46 single-family homes, a transit station, a community park, and a day care center.

The OCBC is the leading business organization in Orange County, California. OCBC provides the forum for businesses to join together, often in conjunction with government and educational institutions, to invest in the growth and prosperity of the fifth largest county in America.
For more information on the Orange County Business Council visit www.ocbc.org. Stan Oftelie, President, Orange County Business Council, 2 Park Plaza, Suite 100, Irvine, CA 92614-5904
Phone: 949-476-2242, Fax: 949-476-0443, Email: softelie@ocbc.org.

D. Santa Barbara Region Economic Community Project (ECP)

The Santa Barbara Region Economic Community Project (ECP) began as a collection of technology company and community leaders working together to help the Santa Barbara region emerge from the impacts of the recession and defense cutbacks. As the economy improved and these new economy companies took hold in the area, the attention of the group turned to addressing issues of land-use and social equity. ECP's present lead project is an urban modeling effort entitled ReGIS, the Regional Impacts of Growth Study. ECP is working closely with the UCSB Geography Department to develop a multi-jurisdictional GIS based urban growth model that shows changes in the urban footprint as well as changes in land-use within the urban area, combined with a graphic-based model that tracks a variety of community indicators. ECP and UCSB will spend this summer conducting a public outreach campaign to validate the model, its scenarios, outputs and assumptions. The model should be web-enabled by the end of the year. By fall 2002 ECP hopes to complete ReGIS, which will provide a detailed analysis on future build-out scenarios along with policy recommendations for improved regional planning.

For more information on the Santa Barbara Region Economic Community Project contact Jon Clark, Executive Director, at 805-965-8080, or jclark@wpmfoundation.org.

E. San Diego Dialogue

Are local citizens more flexible than commonly imagined when it comes to smart growth? That's what San Diego Dialogue has been exploring over the past year through a unique public opinion research project funded by the Hewlett Foundation. Using an innovative "Choice-work" methodology developed by public opinion guru Dan Yankelovich, the Dialogue has held a series of daylong conversations with groups of citizens from across San Diego County on questions of growth, governance and quality of life. The results of this effort might surprise some of the nay-sayers who question whether smart growth can happen in California. After working through a set of choices about the future of their region, most of the participants endorsed a smart growth agenda that called for greater reliance on public transit, investments in higher density housing and amenities for older communities that agree to capture a significant share of the region's future growth. Over 75% of the participants developed a more favorable opinion towards strengthening regional government to help San Diego fight traffic congestion, high housing costs and the rapid loss of open space.

San Diego Dialogue is part of the Division of Extended Studies and Public Programs at the University of California, San Diego. For more information on San Diego Dialogue, please visit the Dialogue's website www.sddialogue.org, or write to San Diego Dialogue, Division of Extended Studies and Public Programs, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0170-D, La Jolla, CA 92093-0170. Tel: (858) 534-8638 Fax: (858) 622-4842 Email: sddialogue@ucsd.edu

For more information in general on Collaborative Regional Initiatives (CRIs) around California, please visit: calregions.urbaninsight.com.

II. New PPIC Survey on Growth

Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) Statewide Survey: Special Survey on Growth-May 2001, by Mark Baldassare, Senior Fellow and Survey Director. This is the eighteenth PPIC Statewide Survey and the first in a new series of surveys that will focus on population growth, land use, and the environment. This new series - which will be carried out in addition to the traditional PPIC surveys - is being conducted in collaboration with The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The James Irvine Foundation, and The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. This initial survey focuses in particular on perceptions of population growth and its consequences. Among other findings, the survey revealed that only 8% of Californians understand that most future population growth in the state will come from births within, not from migration from other states or immigration from other countries! The report includes survey questions and results, and may be ordered online at the PPIC website, https://www.ppic.org/order/cart.asp?ItemNumb=501MBS. To download a PDF copy of the report, visit http://www.ppic.org/#survey18.

For more studies conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California, or for general information about PPIC, visit their website at www.ppic.org, or write them at 500 Washington Street, Suite 800, San Francisco, California 94111. Telephone: (415) 291-4400, Fax: (415) 291-4401, Email: info@ppic.org.

III. Regional News and Information

A. New Report

CCRL published the first-ever "State of California's Regions" Report, "SOCR 2001". "The State of California's Regions 2001" is the first major report declaring the state of California a "state of regions." The report asserts that certain major issues such as population growth, economic development, poverty reduction, and the environment, can only be addressed successfully at the regional level.

To download an electronic version of the SOCR 2001 report, please visit: http://calregions.urbaninsight.com/publications.html

To request a print copy of SOCR 2001 or for additional written information on the Center or the Collaborative Regional Initiatives, please contact: Emily Liolin at the California Center for Regional Leadership, 455 Market Street, Suite 1100, San Francisco, CA 94105, (PH) 415-882-7300, (Fax) 415-882-7272, or email us at emily@ccrl.org.

B. New Project

California 2000 (C2K). A new coalition of C2K partners will build on the previous efforts of C2K to engage citizens of California in the state's fiscal, land use and governance policy reform efforts. The project, with funding provided by The James Irvine Foundation and anticipated from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, will organize local, regional and state wide dialogues and undertake efforts to reach community leaders from all walks of life on these reform issues and build a state of the art web outreach and resource capacity. The "practicum" for this year-long project will be planning for growth, state-local finance reform, and infrastructure reform. The eight partners are: California Center for Regional Leadership (CCRL), California Futures Network (CFN), City, County, Schools Partnership (CCS), Center for Governmental Studies (CGS), Environmental Policy Center (EPC), Latino Issues Forum (LIF), League of Women Voters of California Educational Fund (LWVCEF), and San Diego Dialogue (SDD).

For more information on the work of C2K, contact Community Partners, 606 S. Olive Street, Suite 2400, Los Angeles, CA 90014, 213/439-9640 Paul Vandeventer, President, Community Partners at paulv@communitypartners.org. Visit the Community Partner website at www.communitypartners.org.

Or, contact the California Center for Regional Leadership, 455 Market Street, Suite 1100, San Francisco, CA 94105, (PH) 415-882-7300, (Fax) 415-882-7272, or email Nick Bollman, President, CCRL, at nbollman@ccrl.org. Visit the CCRL website at calregions.urbaninsight.com.

C. New Employment Opportunities

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT: C2K Network Partners is seeking a Network Facilitator. C2K Network Partners seeks an experienced candidate to act as a facilitator and coordinator of the network activities during the coming 12 months and possibly beyond. Activities will include organizing local, regional and statewide dialogues, and communications efforts that support and build on these forums to encourage continued engagement.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest, resume, and salary history to:

Paul Vandeventer, President
Community Partners
606 S. Olive Street, Suite 2400
Los Angeles, CA 90014
213/439-9640

CCRL JOB ANNOUNCEMENT: CRI Program Officer. CCRL is seeking an experienced professional to provide leadership for our program of technical support to the Collaborative Regional Initiatives. Support includes technical assistance for organizational development, leadership development, fund-raising, and program development. This is a full-time salaried exempt position, based in the Bay Area. Travel required. The position offers excellent compensation, with a comprehensive benefits package, including an employer-contribution pension plan.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest, resume, salary history, and writing sample:

"CRI Program Officer Search"
Attention: Nick Bollman, President
California Center for Regional Leadership
455 Market Street, Suite 1100
San Francisco, CA 94105
nbollman@ccrl.org

Email submissions preferred, or fax materials to 415-882-7272. No calls, please.

CCRL JOB ANNOUNCEMENT: C2K Program Officer. CCRL is seeking an experienced candidate to act as Program Officer for the CCRL component of the C2K Project. This is a full-time salaried exempt position, based in the Bay Area. The position offers excellent compensation, with a comprehensive benefits package, including an employer-contribution pension plan.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest, resume, salary history, and writing sample:

"C2K Program Officer Search"
Attention: Nick Bollman, President
California Center for Regional Leadership
455 Market Street, Suite 1100
San Francisco, CA 94105
nbollman@ccrl.org

Email submissions preferred, or fax materials to 415-882-7272. No calls, please.

SPECIAL NOTE OF THANKS: We would like to extend our deepest gratitude to The James and Rebecca Morgan Foundation for their generous support of the California Center for Regional Leadership.